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Remus

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See what’s hidden in the pages of Remus’s DNA story. You can learn about the breeds that make Remus who he is, his genetic family tree, and even go back in time to see where his ancestors came from.

Breed mix

31.3% Chow Chow
16.8% Australian Shepherd
14.7% Australian Cattle Dog
11.9% Border Collie
6.6% Brittany
3.9% Cocker Spaniel
3.8% Alaskan Malamute
11.0% Supermutt Help

Embark Supermutt analysis

What’s in that Supermutt? There may be small amounts of DNA from these distant ancestors:

What’s your dog’s story? Find out with Embark!

Genetic Stats

Wolfiness: 0.6 % LOW Help
Predicted Adult Weight: 50 lbs Help
Genetic Age: 45 human years Help

Embark family

Explore other Embark dogs that have one or more breed percentages that are similar to Remus

Breed Mix By Chromosome

Our advanced test identifies from where Remus inherited every part of the chromosome pairs in his genome. Each chromosome section is colored to represent the breed that it comes from.

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Family tree

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Explore an interactive family tree and get a picture of Remus’s family.

Breed Families

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Dog breeds have been created over time for work and companionship. Find out about other dog breeds related to the breeds found in Remus.

Maternal Line

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Through the DNA inherited from Remus’s mother we can trace his ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. Find out how far Remus’s family has traveled.

Paternal Line

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The Y-Chromosome is only passed down from father to son. Remus’s DNA includes a story of where his father’s ancestors came from. We’ll show you more about how we categorize his ancestors all based of the science of genetics.

Let us know and we will contact Remus’s owner and make sure he is reunited with his family soon! Thank you for helping out our furry friends.

What’s your dog’s story?

Now that you have explored what’s behind Remus find out what your dog’s DNA has to tell you. Embark tells you more about your dog than you ever thought possible. Are you ready? Let’s go!

 
Large screen pedigre From Embark PARENTS GRANDPARENTS GREAT GRANDPARENTS Chow Chow mix Mixed Chow Chow Cocker Spaniel / Alaskan Malamute mix Australian Shepherd / Brittany mix Australian Cattle Dog / Border Collie mix Chow Chow Chow Chow Cocker Spaniel mix Alaskan Malamute mix Australian Shepherd Brittany mix Australian Cattle Dog Border Collie
Explore by tapping your dog’s parents and grand parents.

Our algorithms predict this is the most likely family tree to explain Remus’s breed mix, but this family tree may not be the only possible one.

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Breed Families

>
Dog breeds have been created over time for work and companionship. Find out about other dog breeds related to the breeds found in Remus.

Maternal Line

>
Through the DNA inherited from Remus’s mother we can trace his ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. Find out how far Remus’s family has traveled.

Paternal Line

>
The Y-Chromosome is only passed down from father to son. Remus’s DNA includes a story of where his father’s ancestors came from. We’ll show you more about how we categorize his ancestors all based of the science of genetics.

What’s your dog’s story?

Now that you have explored what’s behind Remus find out what your dog’s DNA has to tell you. Embark tells you more about your dog than you ever thought possible. Are you ready? Let’s go!

DNA shows us the unique path to each of today’s recognized breeds by exposing the relatedness between them.
Chow Chow
3 related breeds
Chow Chow
This distinctive-looking dog breed has a proud, independent spirit that some describe as catlike. He can be aloof — if you’re looking for a cuddle buddy, this probably isn’t the best breed for you — and downright suspicious of strangers. But for the right person, he’s a fiercely loyal companion.
Related Breeds
Shiba Inu
Cousin breed
Chinese Shar-Pei
Cousin breed
Akita
Cousin breed
Australian Cattle Dog
6 related breeds
Australian Cattle Dog
A classic cattle dog, Australian Cattle Dogs were developed from a mixture of breeds in Australia in the 19th century, and still maintain their energetic herding instincts today.
Related Breeds
Border Collie
Sibling breed
Koolie
Sibling breed
Australian Kelpie
Sibling breed
Collie
Cousin breed
Shetland Sheepdog
Cousin breed
Bearded Collie
Cousin breed
Border Collie
4 related breeds
Border Collie
Border Collies are highly energetic and work oriented herding dogs, whose stamina is matched by their intelligence and alertness. If you want the smartest dog out there, then you have come to the right place!
Related Breeds
Bearded Collie
Cousin breed
Collie
Cousin breed
Australian Shepherd
Cousin breed
Shetland Sheepdog
Cousin breed
Brittany
3 related breeds
Brittany
Brittanys are versatile gun dogs whose high energy and affection levels also make them a popular family dog.
Related Breeds
English Setter
Cousin breed
Gordon Setter
Cousin breed
Irish Setter
Cousin breed
Cocker Spaniel
4 related breeds
Cocker Spaniel
Cocker Spaniels are handsome and intelligent hunting dogs that are also well suited to life as a loving family pet.
Related Breeds
English Cocker Spaniel
Sibling breed
Sussex Spaniel
Cousin breed
English Springer Spaniel
Cousin breed
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Cousin breed
Alaskan Malamute
4 related breeds
Alaskan Malamute
The Alaskan Malamute features a powerful, sturdy body built for stamina and strength. It reigns as one of the oldest dog breeds whose original looks have not been significantly altered. This intelligent canine needs a job and consistent leadership to avoid becoming bored or challenging to handle.
Related Breeds
Siberian Husky
Sibling breed
Greenland Dog
Cousin breed
Chinook
Cousin breed
Carolina Dog
Cousin breed

Some images and text courtesy of the AKC, used with permission.

Explore more

Swipe left and right to explore more results, or choose a category below

Family tree

>
Explore an interactive family tree and get a picture of Remus’s family.

Maternal Line

>
Through the DNA inherited from Remus’s mother we can trace his ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. Find out how far Remus’s family has traveled.

Paternal Line

>
The Y-Chromosome is only passed down from father to son. Remus’s DNA includes a story of where his father’s ancestors came from. We’ll show you more about how we categorize his ancestors all based of the science of genetics.

What’s your dog’s story?

Now that you have explored what’s behind Remus find out what your dog’s DNA has to tell you. Embark tells you more about your dog than you ever thought possible. Are you ready? Let’s go!

Through Remus’s mitochondrial DNA we can trace his mother’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1d

Haplotype

A91/11/378

A1d

Remus’s Haplogroup

This female lineage can be traced back about 15,000 years to some of the original Central Asian wolves that were domesticated into modern dogs. The early females that represent this lineage were likely taken into Eurasia, where they spread rapidly. As a result, many modern breed and village dogs from the Americas, Africa, through Asia and down into Oceania belong to this group! This widespread lineage is not limited to a select few breeds, but the majority of Rottweilers, Afghan Hounds and Wirehaired Pointing Griffons belong to it. It is also the most common female lineage among Papillons, Samoyeds and Jack Russell Terriers. Considering its occurrence in breeds as diverse as Afghan Hounds and Samoyeds, some of this is likely ancient variation. But because of its presence in many modern European breeds, much of its diversity likely can be attributed to much more recent breeding.

A91/11/378

Remus’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1d haplogroup, this common haplotype occurs in village dogs all over the world. Among the 29 breeds that we have detected it in to date, the most frequent breeds we see expressing it are Afghan Hounds, Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs, and Borzois.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

The vast majority of Rottweilers have the A1d haplogroup.

Explore more

Swipe left and right to explore more results, or choose a category below

Family tree

>
Explore an interactive family tree and get a picture of Remus’s family.

Breed Families

>
Dog breeds have been created over time for work and companionship. Find out about other dog breeds related to the breeds found in Remus.

Paternal Line

>
The Y-Chromosome is only passed down from father to son. Remus’s DNA includes a story of where his father’s ancestors came from. We’ll show you more about how we categorize his ancestors all based of the science of genetics.

What’s your dog’s story?

Now that you have explored what’s behind Remus find out what your dog’s DNA has to tell you. Embark tells you more about your dog than you ever thought possible. Are you ready? Let’s go!

Through Remus’s Y-chromosome we can trace his father’s ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. This map helps you visualize the routes that his ancestors took to your home. Their story is described below the map.

Haplogroup

A1a

Haplotype

H1a.8

A1a

Remus’s Haplogroup

Some of the wolves that became the original dogs in Central Asia around 15,000 years ago came from this long and distinguished line of male dogs. After domestication, they followed their humans from Asia to Europe and then didn't stop there. They took root in Europe, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago. The Vizsla is a Central European hunting dog, and all male Vizslas descend from this line. During the Age of Exploration, like their owners, these pooches went by the philosophy, "Have sail, will travel!" From the windy plains of Patagonia to the snug and homey towns of the American Midwest, the beaches of a Pacific paradise, and the broad expanse of the Australian outback, these dogs followed their masters to the outposts of empires. Whether through good fortune or superior genetics, dogs from the A1a lineage traveled the globe and took root across the world. Now you find village dogs from this line frolicking on Polynesian beaches, hanging out in villages across the Americas, and scavenging throughout Old World settlements. You can also find this "prince of patrilineages" in breeds as different as German Shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Pugs, Border Collies, Scottish Terriers, and Irish Wolfhounds. No male wolf line has been as successful as the A1a line!

H1a.8

Remus’s Haplotype

Part of the large A1a haplogroup, this very common haplotype occurs in village dogs throughout the world (including southeast Asia, which is uncommon for A1a’s). Among the 25 breeds we see this haplotype in, it occurs most frequently in Labrador Retriever, Vizsla, and English Springer Spaniel.

Some other Embark dogs with this haplotype:

Dogs with A1a lineage travelled during European Colonial times.

Explore more

Swipe left and right to explore more results, or choose a category below

Family tree

>
Explore an interactive family tree and get a picture of Remus’s family.

Breed Families

>
Dog breeds have been created over time for work and companionship. Find out about other dog breeds related to the breeds found in Remus.

Maternal Line

>
Through the DNA inherited from Remus’s mother we can trace his ancestry back to where dogs and people first became friends. Find out how far Remus’s family has traveled.

What’s your dog’s story?

Now that you have explored what’s behind Remus find out what your dog’s DNA has to tell you. Embark tells you more about your dog than you ever thought possible. Are you ready? Let’s go!