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Spanish Galgo

Spanish Galgo

Spanish Galgos are often called the “Spanish Greyhound” and it’s really no wonder why—they look very much like greyhounds. Actually it’s more likely that these dogs are the predecessors to the English Greyhound that we have today; however, they are a totally distinct breed. Spanish Galgos are taller but slighter and have very long tails and snouts. They also come in two different kinds of coats (wire-haired and smooth haired), which is not a characteristic of the English Greyhound. They are a very ancient breed of dog and are a member of the sighthound family.

Illustration courtesy of the Swedish Kennel Club

About this Breed

Spanish Galgos are often called the “Spanish Greyhound” and it’s really no wonder why—they look very much like greyhounds. Actually it’s more likely that these dogs are the predecessors to the English Greyhound that we have today; however, they are a totally distinct breed. Spanish Galgos are taller but slighter and have very long tails and snouts. They also come in two different kinds of coats (wire-haired and smooth haired), which is not a characteristic of the English Greyhound. They are a very ancient breed of dog and are a member of the sighthound family.

Spanish Galgos can trace their origins back to the Holy Roman Empire, where they were even featured on coins. Originally Spanish Galgos were used primarily to hunt and chase rabbits. They were kept by royal families, nobleman, the aristocracy, and commoners and were extremely popular throughout most of Spanish history. Unfortunately, they fell out of popularity a little bit when new and more exotic looking breeds were introduced to Europe in the 19th century; however, they are making a comeback now that people are realizing how unique they are and how intrinsically tied they are to the history of Spain.

Spanish Galgos are gentle, laid back, and introspective dogs. While they are extremely fast and possess incredible endurance while working, at home they are content to curl up and relax with their beloved family. Despite their size, they can make very good city or apartment dogs because they tend to take up very little space and are very subdued when inside the home. This does not mean that they will be happy staying in the apartment all day. Far from it. They require a good deal of time outside and should be allowed to run in a safe and enclosed area.

They do very well with other dogs and pets, though they should be supervised with cats unless raised with them from puppyhood. They are not a good choice for families with rodents because they may see them as prey.

These dogs, unlike their English counterparts, are still relatively rare outside of Europe and may be hard to find in the United States. But for the family that is willing to make the effort, they will be rewarded with a loving and gentle pet.

Spanish Galgos on Embark

Explore some Embark dogs that share Spanish Galgo ancestry.

  • Silverio

    Silverio

    Fosc

    Fosc

    Guapo

    Guapo

    Minion

    Minion

  • Étan

    Étan

    Druso

    Druso

    Winnie

    Winnie

    Apollo

    Apollo

  • Streak

    Streak

    Pietro

    Pietro

    Marcelino

    Marcelino

    Pascal

    Pascal